Using GoPro’s to communicate science

Mattias of qBionano and colleagues at the University of Melbourne, the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and Imperial College London are exploring the use of videos to help communicate science, experimental procedures and lab protocols. Learn more in the video below made by C&EN magazine.

A growing number of chemists are using action cameras like GoPros, cell phone cameras, and other inexpensive video equipment to record their experimental procedures. While toting a camera along as you jump out of a plane, as one researcher did, is definitely on the extreme end of things, these recordings are proving to be useful communication tools both in the lab and in published articles. Björnmalm worked with several collaborators on lab videos, including Frank Caruso, Jiwei Cui, and Joseph J. Richardson at the University of Melbourne; and Molly Stevens and Stacey Skaalure at Imperial College London.

From C&EN’s YouTube channel.

Mattias Björnmalm of Imperial College London cares deeply about scientific reproducibility. When he went skydiving to test how metal-organic framework crystals form in low-gravity-like conditions, he documented the whole thing on video. Björnmalm is part of a growing number of chemists who are using inexpensive video equipment, such as cell phone cameras and action cameras like GoPros, to record their step-by-step experimental procedures. Strapping on a camera and jumping out of a plane is an extreme example of recording an experiment, but even the more mundane videos are proving to be useful communication tools both in the lab and in published articles.

From C&EN magazine.

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